Show Preview - May 2010

Visual Attractions
By Wanda Jankowski

Bright and sophisticated color pops and touch-me textures join fresh twists on classic motifs in fabrics and trims set for display during Showtime

The Imagination Collection from Trimland includes 23 items in 50 color ways.
San Marco from Chella Textiles is made with recycled and recyclable polyolefin. Offered in five colors, it features a Fortuny-inspired acanthus-and-vine design.

The recession, albeit in recovery, hasn’t put a damper on creativity when it comes to designs in fabrics and trims showcased at Showtime. The event, produced by the International Textile Market Association (ITMA), runs from June 6 to 9, 2010, in High Point, NC. The products debuting there emphasize visual and textural interest creatively achieved via construction, materials and color.

Regal Fabrics’ Cha Cha Collection plays with rich colors that render contemporary patterns: an oversized floral, an octagonal geometric and paint-stroke designs. Regal’s Tango Collection celebrates black and white and pumps up the interest with texture in bold, black-flocked medallions, florals and graphic basket weave on a rayon/cotton textured ground. Both collections can be paired with the company’s Pace solid body cloth available in a range of colors.

Spot On, designed by Louise Russell for Carnegie, may look like cotton, but it is actually made with durable Crypton Green certified, 100 percent post-consumer recycled polyester. The neutral background is juxtaposed with multi-colored dots in a random and intricate repeat.

Running The Style Gamut

Textile Fabric Associates offers the contemporary Hammered, a geometric that plays with circles, dots and dashes rendered in graphite.

Bridging the gap between contemporary and traditional is Softline’s Sandridge Collection of poly-cotton blend striped linen looks offered in 22 styles and available in both ready-made curtains and by the bolt.
There is no shortage of historically inspired options from fabric suppliers.

Trend-Spotting
By The Experts: Hermine Mariaux

Hermine Mariaux is president and ceo of Hermine Mariaux Inc., a licensing and international marketing firm. Here, she details trends in color and pattern in fabrics, trims and other home furnishings.

What design trends have been prevalent in spring 2010 launches?

“Standouts during High Point market in April were menswear textiles, seen almost everywhere at upholstery houses and at every price point: Herringbone, plaid, windowpane, glencheck and houndstooth covered the menswear terrain and fit well with a renewed interest in and emphasis on neutrals. Ticking stripes were also part of the classics revival.

“Grays were fewer, morphing into warmer shades of taupe. The brown family, from golden beiges to deep espresso, reigned supreme.

“Texture was extremely important. Linens were prominent but displayed added effects through striations or slubbing to raise their profile and hand. The look peaked with the rough potato sack linens. Even a croc-embossed velvet was seen. Fretwork motifs were prevalent in both wovens and prints pointing to garden-related topics.

“While color made a splash only occasionally, when it did, it pulled out all the stops combining in one setting (at Century) hot coral, bright turquoise, Granny Smith apple green and taxi-cab yellow lacquers for a knock-out presentation.

“Trims were more often used on traditional upholstery pieces and pillows, such as moss and double tassel fringe, but in at least one case, Dransfield & Ross used rope as three-dimensional ‘embroidery’ on its stylish but casual pillows.”

Chella Textiles offers San Marco, a Fortuny-inspired acanthus-and-vine design named for Venice’s Piazza San Marco, home of The Fortuny Museum. Made with 100 percent recycled and recyclable polyolefin, the fabric is well-suited for use on small pillows, larger upholstered furniture and draperies indoors as well as outside. The San Marco is available in five colors: alabaster, raffia, moss, smoke and coco.

JLA Home offers a grouping for lovers of classics. The collection begins with Campbell, a classic windowpane plaid made with 45 percent cotton on a polyester warp in a neutral palette of cream, brown and chocolate. The coordinating chair pattern features a Honeybee centered within an interwoven honeycomb design. A natural linen, with a heavy construction of 55 percent linen and 45 percent cotton for a buttery hand, forms an accent to the collection. A wool-look pattern provides the finale to this “town and country” style range.

A classic floral from MDS fabrics is the Rose Garden. The versatile design is shown in royal blue applied to a duvet cover, throw, pillows and drapes. MDS’ Tree of Life crewel rug is an ideal complement to the Rose Garden pattern.

Hi-Tech & Eco

Although Xorel textiles have been around since 1981, Carnegie is further improving their performance by introducing X-Protect Barrier Backing specifically for any Xorel fabric approved for upholstery use. The protective backing is engineered to prevent stains and other substances from reaching the foam, thereby increasing cushion protection.

Phifer uses technology to go eco-friendly in outdoor fabrics. Its GeoBella™ PVC-free outdoor cushion fabrics are made with 100 percent olefin yarns recycled from post-industrial waste. The earth-friendly fabrics lend themselves to repeat recycling.

GeoBella fabrics are fade and stain resistant, easy to clean and do not absorb water, making them resistant to mold and mildew growth.

Lady Fabrics takes an organic approach in its 2010 Collection for upholstery and drapery by offering Oeko-tex certified textiles made with organic 100 percent wools and manufactured within an eco-conscious ISO9001 vertically integrated textile mill. The collection includes both fashion forward colors and neutrals.

Trim Treasures

In the trimming arena, Expo International offers a traditional-style embellishment in the Chelsea Ball Tassel Trim. It features thread-wrapped balls that complete the bead and fiber tassels. The woven gimp is accented by corded scallops along the top edge to add interest. This trim is available in 10 multi-color palettes.

Trend-Spotting By The Experts:
Jill Sands

Jill Sands, formerly an interior designer with her own firm, is publisher of “The Trend Forecaster” a newsletter that explores in-depth developing trends for the home décor industry. Below, she shares her insights on how the recession has affected trends in home furnishings, including fabrics and trims.

What trends are affected by recession recovery?

“Consumers are beginning to exhale a sigh of relief that the worst is over. Purchasing is moving from ‘need’ to ‘want’.

“Details are where the splurges will occur. Like apparel fashion’s little-black-dress with fantastic accessories, the stimulating new-neutrals palette is safe for the big-ticket items. It’s become the canvas, allowing accessorizing flexibility with splashes of color and pattern. Consumers will continue to be cautious in their spending and will look for safety and exclusive detailing in big-tickets, but will have lots of fun accessorizing.”

How has the recession changed the business?

“The recession has changed the purchasing mind-set of consumers. People will still buy, but purchases will be reflective vs. reckless, functional vs. frivolous. Value will be the defining word. Quality+Price=Value. Consumers will always ‘need’ window coverings, bedding and bath items, furniture, etc., but they will pursue their purchases attuned to quality, environmental impact and value.”

“Consumers can no longer afford nor can they justify the excesses. They want simple, cozy, easy and comfortable with exciting details and accessories.”

Trimland is also showcasing traditional trimmings. The Fascination Collection includes 30 items in 28 varied colorways. The Imagination Collection includes 23 items in 50 different colorways. Both collections include a full line of trimmings, including matching tiebacks, key tassels, beaded trims and rosettes.

Fabricut’s Jeweled Obsession Collection draws inspiration from the concept of trims mimicking jewelry adorning flawless skin. The color palette is adapted from the neutral tones of precious metals and jewel tones found in couture accessories.

The Earth Elements Trim Collection from Joanne/J.F. Fabrics combines fabric from the Earth Elements Fabric Collection and drapery hardware from the Essentials Collection. Designed by Wesley Mancini exclusively for Joanne/J.F. Fabrics, Earth Elements trims and tassels include 12 designs, each available in 10 stylish colors. Unique items in the collection are a wide-band tape, a beaded tassel fringe and a beaded cushion tassel.

Several suppliers feature trimmings that echo elements found in nature. Samuel & Sons debuts the nature-inspired Oasis Glamour Collection from designer Lori Weitzner. The collection, which includes tiebacks, beaded fringes and a pleated border, is marked by dimensional texture and cultural influences.

The Yuma tieback from Samuel & Sons features three strands of ebony toned, elliptical pods from the Sibukaw tree. The Palmyra tieback includes a triple strand of circular wooden beads wrapped with minute banana plant fibers for a gleaming finish.

The Hamptons Collection by Brimar consists of earth-friendly trimmings in a palette of beachfront hues ranging from warm neutrals to cool seaside tones. Eco-fibers such as bamboo and Tencel are dipped in chemical-free dyes to produce natural embellishments that complement casually elegant interiors.

Fringe styles in the Hamptons Collection feature tassels that incorporate recycled glass beads, salvaged wood beads and yarn-covered bobbles. The grouping also includes petite lipcord, brush fringe, unique loop fringe and a tape with an interlocking wave pattern.

With consumer confidence rising and the wheels of the national economy slowing turning again, fabric and trimming suppliers are ready with a range of fresh designs and new constructions to meet the building demand for something new and exciting.

Resources

LDB INTERIOR TEXTILES is published by EW Williams Publications Company
2125 Center Avenue, Suite 305, Fort Lee, NJ 07024-5898, USA Phone: 1-201- 592-7007 Fax: 1-201-592-7171